Michigan Copper and Iron Mining History and Politics: May 2, 2011Fayette State Park - Judith Tellez-G


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La Fayette State Park
An exceptional historical place located on the Garden Peninsula, MI. It is named after Fayette Brown the agent of the Jackson Iron Company who selected the site for the abundance of its natural resources such as dolomite stone, hardwood forest, farm land, and lakes that kept the industry functioning . At once, Fayette was one of the most productive Iron melting sites in the Upper Penninsula in the mid 1800s. With two blasts furnances and a lime stone kiln, the Jacson Company was able to exploit Pig iron and lime stone two of the Michigan most valueable ore resources.
Fayette was more than an industrial company, it was a community of five hundred people living in this location. The townsite had its own labors’ cabins, rail road grades, water line, blacksmith shop site, machine shop, carpenter shop site, stock barn, town hall, company store, school, medical facilities, jail, shop, and hotel. These facilities provided fo the welfare for its residents and visitors to sustain the workface of Fayette Iron industry.


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Class Photos 2011:
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This is the view the supervisor would see from their home on the hill. These are the two buildings that pig iron would be processed and formed ending on December 1, 1890 in Fayette, MI. - Heather Bartels

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Another photo of the furnace building, within the building raw iron deposits were smelted into pig iron bars, then loaded on to freighters to be transported to the factories of the United States. The forest behind the furnace building is all regrowth since the closing of Fayette. The lumber in the surrounding area was utilized to make charcoal for the smelting process. – David Eggleston

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Medical facility in Fayette, MI. Back in the 1840, Medical services were considered a luxury. In the case here in Fayette, nearly 500 residents lived in and close to the town. During the process of working with pig iron, there were hot furnaces, many specialty metal products and persistent flue like symptoms causing havoc on the townspeople. This is one of the early doctor offices in which the people could pay to attend. - Jeff Janofski

This is the back view of the hotel located at Fayette. The hotel represented some of the grander facilities in the mining town. Some of its finer features include the woodworking elements such as the flooring and banisters, as well as some of the tapistries located in the main foyer. The location also served a purpose in terms of showcasing as well as the Boarding House located on the hill above. - Ashley Holloway
This is the back view of the hotel located at Fayette. The hotel represented some of the grander facilities in the mining town. Some of its finer features include the woodworking elements such as the flooring and banisters, as well as some of the tapistries located in the main foyer. The location also served a purpose in terms of showcasing as well as the Boarding House located on the hill above. - Ashley Holloway
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This is a charcoal kiln at ruins from the Jackson Iron Company preserved at Fayette State Park near Manistique, in the Michigan Upper Peninsula. - Judith Tellez-G

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Workers at Fayette removed dolomite from these cliffs. Dolomite was used in the pig iron process. Photo by Jeff Fisher

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The Black Smiths shop at Fayette. it is now a display that gives a very good view of life in Fayette.-Kait Greathouse

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The supervisors house which was located in a distinct location so they could see the all the work in the smelting building. - Joe Fuld

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Fayettes workers,both skilled and unskilled used an assertment of hand tools for various adjustments and repairs in the daily work Jeffery Dewaters



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The bay area of Fayette State Park where ships use to dock in order to load up pig iron - Andrew Shaver