Michigan Copper and Iron Mining History and Politics: May 2, 2011Hartwick Pines State Park Hartwick State Park has the largest amount of virgin white pine in Lower Michigan with 9,672 acres and also contains a logging museum that provides more information on the lumbering that took place back in the 1880s. The state park used to belong to a lumber company and it was sectioned off to be protected. The museum contained the history of the white pines and the lumber company that used to own the land. After getting a chance to tour the museum a guide took us through the state park where we were able to see some of the virgin white pine. Along the journey through the state park we were taken to the logging museum that was within the park and could see what their living quarters were like and what kind of tools and instruments they used for logging. - Jordan Harris
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http://www.dnr.state.mi.us/publications/pdfs/wildlife/viewingguide/nlp/59Hartwick/index.htm

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Class Photos 2011:

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This is one of the largest old growth forests still in existence today. This is an image of what used to be a railway for the logging companies to get the logs out of the forest easier. Loggers would use the railway as faster transportation to the waterways because the white pines float and it is cheaper to float them down river than to transport by train or other methods. - Heather Bartels


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A Michigan Logging Wheel is shown in this photo. This vital piece of equipment allowed logging to be year round process. Initially, ice roads were built and utilized as the primary method of transporting lumber through the forests to the streams or railroads for delivery to sawmills. The introduction of the Logging Wheel made it possible to harvest abundant pines of Michigan in the warmer months at an alarming rate. The initial prediction of Michigan’s lumber lasting 500 years was extremely inaccurate; our lumber supply lasted less than 100 years. – David Eggleston

This is a photo of a sled used in the logging process. The picture is taking at the logging museum located on the guided trial of Hartwick Pines. This gives you a clear visual of the amount of labor and strain that went into each cut. The efficiency of production is also a factor in this picture being the little amount of log capacity of the sled. The implementation of the railroad and the rotation of methods depending on the season made production more efficient .- Ashley Holloway
This is a photo of a sled used in the logging process. The picture is taking at the logging museum located on the guided trial of Hartwick Pines. This gives you a clear visual of the amount of labor and strain that went into each cut. The efficiency of production is also a factor in this picture being the little amount of log capacity of the sled. The implementation of the railroad and the rotation of methods depending on the season made production more efficient .- Ashley Holloway


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Hartwick Pine: Here is a display of some of the wood working tools the early settlers used to harvest the great white pine. Because of the importance of sharp saws and metal horse shoes, the blacksmith’s job was essential to the industry. I personally thought the sharpening stone was pretty neat.- Jeff Janofski

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Among the white pine forest, it also emerge a small chapel; in the interior of this sanctuary besides pews there is a Nature Prayer. Such prayer shown gratefulness to God as the ultimate creator of nature and that in his grace he shares it with us. This chapel is a place where visitors can stop by and simply thank God for his magnificence creation and freedom that Americans enjoy. -Judith Tellez-G





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A Chapel that was located in the heart of the white pine forest, It was built from white pine trees surrounding it. A few years ago there was a storm that demolished all of the trees, bushes and everything else around it but the chapel was still standing strong. - Joe Fuld

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From the shores of Lake Huron you can see Mackinaw Island. The shape of the island was created by glacier movement. The largest white spot on the island is the Grand Hotel. Photo by Jeff Fisher