Michigan Copper and Iron Mining History and Politics: May 3, 2011
Ramsay, MI
"The start of Ramsay was in the early 1880s, when Captain N.D. Moore and Richard Langford discovered the famous Colby open pit mine, it was the first ore to be found on the Gogebic Range. In 1882 cabins were built. The years 1882 and 1883 were marked by a scene of splendid achievements in the discovery of vast ore in the world on the Range. In October of 1884 the Milwaukee, Lake Shore and Western Rail Road entered the southeastern corner of Ontonagon County. There were two dams built across the Black River. By 1930 the population of Ramsey was 1,700. The coast to build the Keystone bridge was $48,322.00 and one of the only four such bridges in the United States. The arch is 45 feet by 44 feet; it is built of lime stone quarried from Kaukauna, WI. It was finished in 1922 by P.N. Massie 130 ft. long/22 ft. wide. The original wooden school building in Ramsay was located on the southwest corner of Main Street and Wood Street, then in 1922 it was torn down and the new brick school building was built by Rosemurgy Construction Company of Bessemer. Ramsay first Town Hall was located on the northwest corner of Mill Street and George Street, and then in 1923 the New Town Hall was built. Ramsay had five mine shafts from 1890 until 1956. The Eureka No. 1, No.2, No.3, No.4, and NO.5, The Eureka NO.1 and No.2 were both opened in 1890." The NO.4 mine started in 1923." Also a very much hidden feather for tourist visiting Ramsay is the Baker Falls which is on the Black River.
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Ramsay - by Dennis D. Rolando



Class Photos 2012:
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Class Photos 2011:
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This is an image of the back of Ramsay School. The top windows are the science classroom and the bottom windows are the sixth grade classroom where Craig discovered his crush on his teacher. -Heather Bartels

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The Key Stone Bridge, in Ramsay Michigan, was built in the early 1890’s to allow trains access to the region and help transport the recovered Iron Ore deposits to refinement plants. – David Eggleston

This is a photo of a tank located in the park located across from Ramsey School. At one time due to the wealth in the area the park also encompassed a pool, tennis courts, and other attractions for the community. This is yet another example of a community center and social environment, as well as Corporate Paternalism in terms of attraction to an area for mining workers.-Ashley Holloway
This is a photo of a tank located in the park located across from Ramsey School. At one time due to the wealth in the area the park also encompassed a pool, tennis courts, and other attractions for the community. This is yet another example of a community center and social environment, as well as Corporate Paternalism in terms of attraction to an area for mining workers.-Ashley Holloway


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This is a view of the remaining building of high school built in 1921 in Ramsay. Such outstanding architectural structure, a granite foundation, built out red brick, and once home for hundreds of students; today it only reveals the emphasis of education at time.





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The class investigating a rock inexplicably on display at the park in Ramsey. -Kait Greathouse



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The open pit mine that eventually filled in with water. Don't even think about fishing in it because it's the emptiest body of water i've ever seen. - Joe Fuld

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On the Black River, Baker Falls was a major obstacle for transporting natural resources. These falls were located off the beaten path as the other falls were more publically accessible. I found these falls very interesting as the river was formed around huge rock. Seasonal water flow decreases in the warmer months and increases in the wet months. – Jeff Janofski





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The abandoned school in Ramsay now closed as a result of the decline in mining around the area, but once was a important part of the community for higher education - Andrew Shaver



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The town of Ramsay has changed since the mining days. Some of the buildings still remain. At the right of the photo is the old town hall and fire house. Photo by Jeff Fisher.


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The Key Stone Bridge that was built in the late 1890s to transport what was found during mining out of the town by railroad is in better condition than the bridge located behind that was built decades later. Jordan Harris