Michigan Copper and Iron Mining History: May 6, 2011
Hancock
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Also known as "OldReliable" the Quincy Mines were mining for Copper (CU) from the year 1846 to 1945, under the Quincy Mining Company. While on a tour of the mine you will be able to ride the rails down too the opening, and then take another ride via tractor right into the same mine that way known as the worlds deepest shaft travling over 9,250 ft (1.75 miles) down. They will also describe the day of a miner who had to deal with low lighting, dust and different types of drilling depending on when they were working. Drilling went from a three man drill, which consisted of one man holding the bit and the two others hammering the top. Shortly after they moved to a two man machine drill, and then it wasn't much longer until they improved the two man drill to a one man drill with a water attatchment to decrease on the dust. Although the #2 shaft rock house is the only one standing today, originally when the company was in the full swing they had six. Anothe stop you'll be able to make along the way is into the Quincy Mine Hoist House, where you will be able to see the worlds largest steam driven mine hoist, weighing over 880 tons it was able to lift more than 10 tons of ore at more that 34 miles per hour. When the hoist was bought in 1918 it costed the company about $370,000 dollars. - Joe Fuld








Class Photos 2012:
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Class Photos 2011:

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Water car and man car in the #2 Quincy Mine shaft house. Miners and water were raised and lowered by the the hoist in and out of the mines. Photo by Jeff Fisher

This photo demonstrates the lighting in the Quincy Mine using modern electricity. Before the use of electricity, workers used candle lighting. If in an event of the lighting going out workers would either have to stay in the mine or try to find a way out, which resulted in many injuries of falling through shafts, etc. The principle later became lawsuit frenzy against the mining companies on personal injury claims.-Ashley Holloway
This photo demonstrates the lighting in the Quincy Mine using modern electricity. Before the use of electricity, workers used candle lighting. If in an event of the lighting going out workers would either have to stay in the mine or try to find a way out, which resulted in many injuries of falling through shafts, etc. The principle later became lawsuit frenzy against the mining companies on personal injury claims.-Ashley Holloway





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This is a one man drill that changed mining forever. This drill improved the amount of copper being mined by almost 100%. The one man drill could do the equivalent work load of 3 men in 2 days with a hammer and chisel. -Heather Bartels

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The Quincy Mine is a form copper and silver mine. The QMOA offers tours of the second shaft. -Kait Greathouse




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The image above depicts The Nordberg Steam Hoist that fills the space of the hoist house. By becoming the second largest mine by late 1880s, the Quincy Company commissioned the construction of this machine to accelerate the transportation process out of the mines. The drum has a capacity of over two miles of 1-5/8" wire rope (13,300 feet). It was rated at approximately 2500 HP. It was only used for 11 years before it was taken out of service.- Judith Tellez-G





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Quincy Mine #2 Hoist. -Amber LeClear

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hancock bridge by jeff dewaters

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Copper and rocks were transported from the mines via a rail system. Once the blasted rocks were loose, they were manually inserted into a cart. A worker would push the cart to the lift. Remove the copper/rocks onto the lift, then hoist them to the surface. As you can see, it was very hard manual labor. - Jeff Janofski

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Entering the Quincy mine and heading roughly 2,000 feet inwards - Andrew Shaver

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Located at the Quincy Mines, this is where people were lowered into the mining and the copper was brought up from. Jordan Harris


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the worlds largest steam powered hoist, weighing over 880 tons could lift up to 10 tons more than 9,000 feet. - Joe Fuld