Michigan Copper and Iron Mining History: May 7, 2011Marquette, MI








Class Photos:

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This is a model of the smelter at Fayette. It is on display at the Michigan Mining Museum in Marquette, Michigan. Photo by Jeff Fisher.

Example of a chisel located in the Michigan Mining Museum in Marquette. This was the pre cursor to the one or two man drill that was later developed. By using the chisel labor was long and strenuous as well as low production output. The one slight advantage to the chisel method however, was the fact that the dust control for health reasons was not as prominent of a factor.- Ashley Holloway
Example of a chisel located in the Michigan Mining Museum in Marquette. This was the pre cursor to the one or two man drill that was later developed. By using the chisel labor was long and strenuous as well as low production output. The one slight advantage to the chisel method however, was the fact that the dust control for health reasons was not as prominent of a factor.- Ashley Holloway

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This is displayed to look like a safe showing how much money was made from each of the three natural resources in Michigan compared to California’s one nature resource. In Michigan lumber made $4.4 billion, copper made $9.6 billion, and iron ore made $48 billion, whereas, in California gold only made $955 million. -Heather Bartels

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This is picture of the Immigrant Society shown at the Michigan Mining Museum at Marquette. During the apogee of the mining industry, immigration became a phenomenon, particularly in the Upper Peninsula. Consequently, a huge diversity of cultures emerged in this area. Judith Tellez-G

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This sign sits outside of the Michigan Mining Museum. It tells about how an Indian woman managed to hold the mining companys legally responsible for thier contract to her father. -Kait Greathouse

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Mining Drill located inside of the Michigan Mining Museum. This type of drill was secured to the floor and ceiling with a metal bar. Once attached to the bar, the drill could penetrate rocks in order to insert explosives. The Miners would complete a series of hole in relation to how large of an explosive they would like to generate.- Jeff Janofski

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A chart that shows how many miners were employed over the years in Michigan's Iron Industry from 1870 to 1980. Jordan Harris


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A mounted drill and cart which were used by miners in order to extract iron from inside the mines - Andrew Shaver


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Cleveland-Cliffs Iron Company president William Gwinn Mather, Pickands-Mather and Company co-owner Colonel James Pickands and M.A. Hanna Company president Marcus Hanna all dominated the Michigan Iron industry in the late 1800s to early 1900's - Joe Fuld